Middle East

Jordan

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Discover - Jordan

Images of the ancient Nabataean city of Petra, carved from the rock over a thousand years ago, have long been most people’s first impression of Jordan.  But while Petra is indeed one of the most stunning attractions in the Middle East, Jordan offers so much more for the modern traveller. 

 
A well-travelled bridge between sea and desert, east and west, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is a land of mesmerising beauty and contrasts, from the Jordan Valley, fertile, ever changing, to the remote desert canyons, immense and still. Visitors can explore splendid desert castles, gaze in awe at the haunting wilderness of Wadi Rum, or bathe in the restful waters of the Red Sea. 
 
For adventure lovers, there’s horse riding, 4x4 safaris, rock climbing and hiking. For taking it easy, nothing on earth compares to the Dead Sea and the Red Sea, with their many spa facilities. Modern Jordan was founded by King Abdullah I after World War I and today Jordan has grown into a modern nation that has enjoyed a remarkable measure of stability and economic growth in recent decades.

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Details

  • Time Difference: GMT +3 hours
  • Currency: Jordanian Dinar
  • Flying Time from the UK: 5 hours to Amman
  • Visa: Single entry 30-day upon arrival
  • Our Highlight: The ancient city of Petra

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Highlights

Amman, the capital of Jordan, is a fascinating city of contrasts – a unique blend of old and new, ideally situated on a hilly area between the desert and the fertile Jordan Valley.  In the commercial heart of the city, ultra-modern buildings, hotels, smart restaurants, art galleries and boutiques rub shoulders comfortably with traditional coffee shops and tiny artisans' workshops. Everywhere there is evidence of the city's much older past.

 
Without a doubt, one of the world's most amazing place, the Jordan Rift Valley is a dramatic, beautiful landscape, which at the Dead Sea, is over 400m (1,312 ft.) below sea level. The lowest point on the face of the earth, this vast stretch of water receives a number of incoming rivers, including the River Jordan. Once the waters reach the Dead Sea they are land-locked and have nowhere to go, so they evaporate, leaving behind a dense, rich, cocktail of salts and minerals that supply industry, agriculture and medicine with some of its finest products.
 
The Wadi Rum is amaze of monolithic rockscapes rising up from the desert floor to heights of 1,750m creating a natural challenge for serious mountaineers. Hikers can enjoy the tranquility of the boundless empty spaces and explore the canyons and water holes to discover 4000-year-old rock drawings and the many other spectacular treasures this vast wilderness holds in store.

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Muslim Friendly Amenities

More than 92% of Jordanians are Sunni Muslims and approximately 6% are Christians. The majority of Christians belong to the Greek Orthodox Church, but there are also Greek Catholics, a small Roman Catholic community, Syrian Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Armenian Orthodox, and a few Protestant denominations. Several small Shi'a and Druze populations can also be found in Jordan.

 
Sites of Islamic history include Kerak, Ajloun, Mount Nebo, the Tall Mar Ilyas ( place was formerly Tishbi, the home of Prophet Ilyas ASA), As'habal Kaif (the cave of the seven sleepers), the King Abdullah Mosque just to name a few. Halal food is easily accessible in Jordan in hotels and restaurants.

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